Toby Hill-Meyer launches Doing It Online

queer-porn:

Toby Hill-Meyer launches Doing It Online

jiz-kimberly-84Today marks the launch of the newest addition to the TroubleFilms web network, DoingItOnline.Com.

DoingItOnline.com, a collaboration between Handbasket Productions and Trouble Films, offers fresh, trans female-focused content created and curated by filmmaker and activist Tobi Hill-Meyer.

“In the media lately, it seems like everyone gets to have their say about trans women’s sexuality. Everyone…

View On WordPress

fagglet:


Trans* Housing Now - 
Welcome to Queens Cottage Shelter!
Thank you for viewing our campaign. We are a small, grassroots organization that is working with the community to open the first Bay Area trans* women housing program - Queens Cottage Shelter. 
When our founder, Breezy Golden-Farr, a transwoman herself, found herself homeless and without a place to lay her head, she came face to face with a real problem in our community. There is no safe and affordable housing for trans* women in the Bay Area. 
Trans* people are often shunned and abused by the shelter system; they are often forced to sleep on the streets because they are abused and harassed by other shelter residents. Trans* women sorely lack a safe haven, where they can go for supportive housing. Queens Cottage Shelter will work with local partners to help empower residents reach for their goals of recovery, employment, school, and stable housing.    
Miss Farr’s and others have been working tirelessly to open the first ever all transwoman housing program and Oakland. They have teamed up with Transitions House - a trans* housing advocacy group to make this dream a reality. We hope you will join us with passion we have for trans* affirming housing! This dream needs your passion and financial support. 
How can I help?
Though our goal here is modest, it will allow us to start our fundraising for the following:
Help find a residence for Queens Cottage Shelter
Help us start and open our doors to 10 homeless trans women in need of your support. 
Your support will provide short term housing to our community most impacted by violence and discrimination, TWOC and low income trans women. 
Residents will be supported in the house to get connected to community resources including job search support by the Trans* Employment Program (TEEI), healthcare services, and case management. 
It will mean trans* people have access to safe housing, showers, and free meals. 
Perks:
Thank you for supporting this important and needed trans housing program. As our unique way of saying thank you for helping house trans* women of color and low income trans* folks, please check out our perks. Including buttons, t-shirts, and more! At certain donor levels, you even have the opportunity to sit down and meet these girls and hear their story. See first hand  what your financial assistance means to them. And remember, anything will help! 
Thank You! 
We are a registered with the IRS as a non-profit charity and we accept donations of all kinds. Any dollar amount, no matter how small, will be welcomed. Every dollar given is a dollar much appreciated!
[LINK]

This is so important. Only 5 people have backed this so far. Give what you can! Signal boost!

fagglet:

Trans* Housing Now - 

Welcome to Queens Cottage Shelter!

Thank you for viewing our campaign. We are a small, grassroots organization that is working with the community to open the first Bay Area trans* women housing program - Queens Cottage Shelter. 

When our founder, Breezy Golden-Farr, a transwoman herself, found herself homeless and without a place to lay her head, she came face to face with a real problem in our community. There is no safe and affordable housing for trans* women in the Bay Area. 

Trans* people are often shunned and abused by the shelter system; they are often forced to sleep on the streets because they are abused and harassed by other shelter residents. Trans* women sorely lack a safe haven, where they can go for supportive housing. Queens Cottage Shelter will work with local partners to help empower residents reach for their goals of recovery, employment, school, and stable housing.    

Miss Farr’s and others have been working tirelessly to open the first ever all transwoman housing program and Oakland. They have teamed up with Transitions House - a trans* housing advocacy group to make this dream a reality. We hope you will join us with passion we have for trans* affirming housing! This dream needs your passion and financial support. 

How can I help?

Though our goal here is modest, it will allow us to start our fundraising for the following:

  • Help find a residence for Queens Cottage Shelter
  • Help us start and open our doors to 10 homeless trans women in need of your support. 
  • Your support will provide short term housing to our community most impacted by violence and discrimination, TWOC and low income trans women. 
  • Residents will be supported in the house to get connected to community resources including job search support by the Trans* Employment Program (TEEI), healthcare services, and case management. 
  • It will mean trans* people have access to safe housing, showers, and free meals. 

Perks:

Thank you for supporting this important and needed trans housing program. As our unique way of saying thank you for helping house trans* women of color and low income trans* folks, please check out our perks. Including buttons, t-shirts, and more! At certain donor levels, you even have the opportunity to sit down and meet these girls and hear their story. See first hand  what your financial assistance means to them. And remember, anything will help! 

Thank You! 

We are a registered with the IRS as a non-profit charity and we accept donations of all kinds. Any dollar amount, no matter how small, will be welcomed. Every dollar given is a dollar much appreciated!

[LINK]

This is so important. Only 5 people have backed this so far. Give what you can! Signal boost!

(via nemesissy)

sistahmamaqueen:

They only have like 30 votes so far!! PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE VOTE FOR MAJOR!!!!!!!!!!! 

(via nemesissy)

border-war-dispatches:

The marginalization of transgender women in feminism is not new, but the decades-long debate has taken on new dimension thanks to social media and the ease of finding strangers’ personal information online.”

This is worth reading. As a heads up, it describes, in substantial detail,  TERF transphobic harassment and violence targeting trans women.

Absolutely worth reading (if you have the stomach for it), esp. for the history lesson. A lot of this is stuff I already knew about because 1) this is stuff I generally try to follow and 2) I’m a bit of a queer history nerd. But this one part completely blew my mind:

For example, transgender people were able to readily obtain government-funded healthcare prior to 1980. That year, Janice Raymond wrote a report for the Reagan administration called “Technology on the Social and Ethical Aspects of Transsexual Surgery” which informed the official federal position on medical care for transgender people. The paper’s conclusion reads, “The elimination of transsexualism is not best achieved by legislation prohibiting transsexual treatment and surgery, but rather by legislation that limits it and by other legislation that lessens the support given to sex-role stereotyping.” In her book Transgender History, Susan Stryker says that the government curtailed transgender access to government social services under Reagan, “In part in response to anti-transgender feminist arguments that dovetailed with conservative politics.”

(via tgstonebutch)

melissa:

Big love and respect to Janet Mock, whose book Redefining Realness is out today.

"For many years I thought being trans, that being brown, that being a former sex worker, that being a different kind of woman made me less than and undeserving of being heard. So I silenced those parts of myself that I felt would lead me to further marginalization. I hope now to stand more fully in my truth, and that my decision to be authentic about my experiences gives young women like me, who feel they may not have and didn’t have other choices, the strength to step more fully into who they are.”

I have been asked to do some asking around on behalf of a friend. So:

A newly out trans woman friend of mine is looking to connect with other trans women and transfeminine-spectrum folks. She is specifically and especially interested in talking to fat trans women (she is fat) about experiences with medical transition and accessing medical care. She is newly out, but she is older (in her 40s), white, and someone with financial resources and insurance. She is also feeling nervous about 1) potentially encountering transphobia and transmisogyny from her current doctor (she is not yet out to her MD), and 2) encountering fatphobia and esp. being denied HRT because she is fat. She doesn’t know a whole lot of other trans women in general, and right now, she doesn’t know any other trans women who are also fat. She is wondering if anyone would be willing to chat with her, or if anyone just knows of good resources for her to check out. She’s over here on tumblr (she just now created an account for the purposes of chattering with folks). If you know of resources or you want to talk, you can contact her directly through her page.

"When even the best plans and organizations fracture, we revert to relationships that go beyond political or social utility. That means relying upon deeper emotional attachments, maybe even a deeper physical attachments. And that goes back to the clusterfuck I just talking about. As much as sex sells, sex seals. Especially in LGB communities. Trans is not a sexual orientation—but lesbian is. Yet, if you have heard that every dyke has gone out with every other dyke, you are probably leaving out trans dykes. It is a rare and secure lesbian who would date one of us, and yes, that is significant.

Within dyke space, sexual and romantic relationships permeate the community, and not being able to comfortably flirt or fuck or laze away at a women’s spa restricts the ability of trans women to participate freely in a group that to a large part is defined by who wants to sleep with whom.

Sex is a mode of communication and acculturation that cannot be separated from social activism, political change, or anything else that queer women are trying to accomplish. Under attack, overworked, stressed, and trying to make rent—in these times, even revolutionaries will reach for the familiar. And until more trans women become part of that familiar, we find ourselves tossed aside in the name of expedience.

Even your dysfunctional ex is a known dysfunction!"

Ryka Aoki’s Girl Talk piece, reprinted in her book, Seasonal Velocities (via marginalutilite)

Awwww! So delighted to see Ryka’s work here (and psyched that it’s a reprint from her piece for Girl Talk, too!).

Also, this line:  "Even your dysfunctional ex is a known dysfunction!"

(via nemesissy)

ANNOUNCING Girl Talk 2013!

I’m super excited for Thursday, and super proud that we are turning five (!). This is going to be an amazing show. Please spread the word, and please come out. 

(Also, I feel a little silly to be reblogging my reblog of my blog post. But this is the easiest way to get all the Girl Talk info out in one fell swoop.)

howtohaveabody:

Beloved readers!

I will be performing brand new work from How To Have A Body at this year’s Girl Talk. Please come out for it! Tickets are available here.

Also, if you need a No One Turned Away For Lack Of Funds ticket, write to <girltalktheshow@gmail.com> and we will add you to our NOTAFLOF list.

<3,
Gina de Vries
Girl Talk Founder & Co-Curatrix
Author & Operator of How To Have A Body (a manuscript in progress & a blog)

queershoulder:

I am so very excited to announce…

Girl Talk 2013!

6.27GirlTalkBnrV3


Now in its fifth year, Girl Talk is a critically acclaimed multi-media performance show promoting dialogue about relationships of all kinds between queer transgender women, queer cisgender women, and genderqueer people. Queer cis women, queer trans women, and genderqueer people are allies, friends, support systems, lovers, and partners to each other every day — from activism that includes everything from Take Back the Night to Camp Trans; to supporting each other in having “othered” bodies in a world that is obsessed with idealized body types; to loving, having sex, and building family with each other in a world that wants us to disappear. At Girl Talk, trans and cis women and genderqueer artists create a wide range of artistic work about their relationships of all kinds – sexual and romantic, friendships, and chosen and blood family. Join us for a night of performance and conversation dedicated to building sisterhood and queer community for ALL women.


June 27

Girl Talk
Curated by: Gina de Vries, Elena Rose, & Julia Serano
Show Location: African-American Arts & Culture Complex (762 Fulton Street @ Webster, San Francisco)
Time: 7:30pm
Price: $12 – $20 sliding scale online; $15 – $20 at the door. (A limited number of Nobody Turned Away Tickets are available by writing to Gina at queershoulder[@]gmail[.]com, and a few work-trade for tix positions might also become available.)
Web Home: http://queerculturalcenter.org/NQAF/performance13/girl-talk/
Buy Tickets:
http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/377312
Facebook Event Page
: https://www.facebook.com/events/331871970271565
“Like” Girl Talk on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/GirlTalkShow
Twitter:
@queershoulder (Gina de Vries) and @JuliaSerano (Julia Serano).

Girl Talk is a proud grantee of the San Francisco Arts Commission’s 2013 Cultural Equity Grants program.


ARTISTS’ BIOS

sDominikaBednarska
Dominika Bednarska
holds a PhD in English and Disability Studies from U.C. Berkeley, and her new book of poetry, Smothered Breath, is forthcoming from Tulip Pulp Press. Her writing has appeared in The Bellevue Literary Review, Petrichor Machine, Blast Furnace, A Bad Penny Review, B (A Barbie Anthology), Journey to Crone, Avatar Review, Storm Cellar, Palimpsest, Muddy River Poetry Review, Wordgathering, Ghosting the Atom: Reflections After the Bomb, What I Want From You: An Anthology of East Bay Lesbian Poets, Cripping Femme, The Culture of Efficiency: Technology in Everyday Life, and Nobody Passes: Rejecting the Rules of Gender and Conformity, a Lambda nominee. Her show My Body Love Story kicked off the National Queer Arts Festival in 2012. For more information, go to dominikabednarskaspeaks.blogspot.com or become a fan on Facebook.

sGinadeVries
Gina de Vries
is a genderqueer femme, a queer Paisano, a devout pervert, and a writer, performer, activist, and cultural worker living, writing, and loving in San Francisco. Ze is the founder and co-curator (with Elena Rose and Julia Serano) of Girl Talk, and is thrilled to see the show going strong in its fifth year. Gina has performed, taught, and lectured everywhere from chapels to leatherbar backrooms to the Ivy Leagues to community colleges. Her university appearances include Harvard, Yale, Reed, The Pacific School of Religion, UW-Madison, and Hampshire. Ze is the founder and facilitator of Sex Workers’ Writing Workshop, a writing class for current & former sex workers at San Francisco’s Center for Sex & Culture (where she also serves on the Advisory Board).

Gina’s publications include That’s Revolting!, Bound to Struggle, Baby Remember My Name, The San Francisco Bay Guardian, $pread: illuminating the sex industry, Curve, Coming & Crying, Take Me There: Trans & Genderqueer Erotica, The Revolution Starts at Home, and Why Are Faggots So Afraid of Faggots. Ze is currently pursuing her Master of Fine Arts in Fiction Writing at San Francisco State University, where ze is at work on How To Have A Body, a book of experimental prose about, well, how to have a body. Find out more at ginadevries.com, and keep track of hir on the daily at queershoulder.tumblr.com and howtohaveabody.tumblr.com.

sDavEnd

DavEnd is a tenderhearted, genderqueer, accordion wielding songwriter, performing artist and designer based in San Francisco.  DavEnd has released two studio albums (How To Hold Your Own Hand, Fruits Commonly Mistaken For Vegetables) and for the past 6 years, has been touring extensively in the U.S., performing at queer teen centers, theatres, festivals, colleges, and backyards. Between tours, Ms. End designs costumes, and most recently has been producing a new musical, costume designing and dancing in production numbers for songwriter Kimya Dawson, appearing in Taylor Mac’s epic 5 hour play “The Lily’s Revenge” and touring the US with Sister Spit. DavEnd’s current project, “Fabulous Artistic Guys Get Overtly Traumatized Sometimes: The Musical!”, brings together the worlds of music and radical performance art in a theatrical extravaganza, exploring the effects of heterosexism and street harassment on the development of queer and trans identity. Photo: Photo: Amber Gregory

hardy_Tara
Tara Hardy
is the working-class queer femme poet who writes and teaches in Seattle, Washington. She is the founder and current creative director of Bent, a writing institute for LGBTIQ people based in Seattle. She is the writer-in-residence at Richard Hugo House in Seattle, and an alumnae of Hedgebrook. In 2002, she was elected by the people and named by the city council as Seattle’s Poet Populist, or poet of the people, and has appeared on seven National Poetry Slam stages. She holds an MFA from Vermont College in fiction writing, and an MSW from the University of Michigan in community organizing. Tara is a daughter of the United Auto Workers, and worked in the Battered Women’s Movement for 15 years. She has toured the United States with Michelle Tea in the Stromboli’s Island show, as well as with Oratrix, an all-girl, all-queer Seattle-based spoken word troupe. She is a member of the Bullhorn Collective, and has performed with the Rolling Thunder Democracy Tour, Vancouver’s Rock for Choice, various Sister Spit shows, the Washington Poet’s Association’s Burning Word festival, Portland’s Youth Pride, San Francisco’s Harvey Milk Institute, and at the Minneapolis Orpheum Theater on the National Poetry Slam team finals stage. Tara’s work appears in Without a Net, Sex and Single Girls, Fusion, Blythe House Quarterly, Brazen, Switched-on-Gutenberg, and her self-published chapbooks Vs and Rant-some. Recordings of her work can be found on Vox Populi Live (the best of the Seattle Poetry Festival), the Seattle Poetry Slam Live CD, and her self-produced CD Dirty River.

sCarolQueen
Dr. Carol Queen
is a writer and cultural sexologist with a Ph.D. in human sexuality. She is a noted essayist whose work has appeared in dozens of anthologies. Her essay collection, Real Live Nude Girl: Chronicles of Sex-Positive Culture, was published in 1997 and reissued in 2002; it is read in university classes across America. Her erotic stories can be found in several Best American Erotica volumes, among many other anthologies; her erotic novel, The Leather Daddy and the Femme, was published in 1998 and won a Firecracker Alternative Book Award the following year. A “director’s cut” edition with new material came out in 2003. Her first book, Exhibitionism for the Shy, published in 1995, explores issues of erotic self-esteem and enhancement and was reissued with new material in 2009. She is co-editor of the anthologies Best Bisexual Erotica (volumes One and Two), Sex Spoken Here, Switch Hitters, and PoMoSexuals; the latter won a Lambda Literary Award in 1998. She’s also edited Whipped! and two volumes of 5 Minute Erotica, short-short erotic fiction.

Queen is the founding director of the Center for Sex & Culture in San Francisco (www.sexandculture.org) and works as staff sexologist and curator of the Antique Vibrator Museum at Good Vibrations, the women-founded sex toy and bookstore in San Francisco, where she has worked since 1990; she blogs for the Good Vibrations web magazine at www.goodvibes.com. She has addressed numerous scholarly and professional conferences, including the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality, the International Condom Conference, the International Conference on Prostitution, and the International Conference on Pornography; she frequently addresses college as well as general and specialized audiences. In February 2009 she debated the question of promiscuity (“Virtue or vice?”) for the Oxford Union at Oxford University, England.

Carol Queen is active on behalf of progressive sex education and sexual minority issues. Perhaps most closely affiliated with the bisexual and sex work communities, she has been speaking publicly about non-mainstream sexualities, from lesbian to leather, for over 35 years. Her perspective in addressing sexual diversity incorporates personal experience, accurate sex information, and informed cultural commentary. For more information (including CV and bibliography) see her website: www.carolqueen.com.

NEW ELENA ROSE
Elena Rose
, a Filipina-Ashkenazic mixed-class trans lesbian mestiza, rode stories out of rural Oregon and hasn’t stopped making words since.  Raised as a curandera troublemaker, she writes online as “Little Light,” travels the country as a preacher and poet, and has dedicated herself to the labor of radical love, monster theology, and justice for those who live at the edges.

In her third year as Girl Talk co-curator and fifth as a performer, Rose has also sweet-talked bloody microphones with the Speak! Radical Women of Color Media Collective, Seattle’s TumbleMe Productions, the Bay’s own Mangos With Chili, and in sold-out shows up and down the Pacific coast.  Her writing has been featured in Aorta and Make/shift magazines and everywhere from law school classrooms to bathroom mirrors, and her first book, “Mountain of Myrrh,” is forthcoming from Dinah Press.  She lives, works, and attends seminary in the East Bay, and haunts abandoned places on the weekends.

sJuliaSerano
Julia Serano
is an Oakland, California-based writer, performer, and co-curator of Girl Talk. She is best known for her 2007 book Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity, which garnered rave reviews—The Advocate placed it on their list of “Best Non-Fiction Transgender Books,” and readers of Ms. Magazine ranked it #16 on their list of the “100 Best Non-Fiction Books of All Time.” Her other writings have appeared in anthologies (including Yes Means Yes: Visions of Female Sexual Power and A World Without Rape, Gender Outlaws: The Next Generation and Word Warriors: 30 Leaders in the Women’s Spoken Word Movement) and in feminist, queer, pop culture and literary magazines and websites such as Bitch Magazine, AlterNet.org, Out, Ms. Magazine blog, Feministing.com, and make/shift.

Julia has gained notoriety in feminist, queer and transgender circles for her unique insights into gender, and her writings have been used as teaching materials in queer and gender studies courses across North America. Her second full-length book, tentatively titled Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive, is slated to be published by Seal Press in the Fall of 2013. juliaserano.com

sJosTruitt
Jos Truitt
is a Boston native currently living in the Bay Area. She is an Editor at the popular blog Feministing.com. Jos has worked for the reproductive health, rights and justice movements as a student at Hampshire College and a national organizer in Washington, DC. She has spoken and trained at numerous national conferences and college campuses about trans issues, reproductive justice, blogging, feminism, and grassroots organizing. Jos is currently pursuing an MFA in Printmaking and an MA in the History and Theory of Contemporary Art at San Francisco Art Institute.


Girl Talk NOTAFLOF Tickets

A quick & important Girl Talk note: It is very important to us that our show be financially accessible to EVERYONE who wants to come. This is a justice issue and a class issue, and it is something we take very seriously. We *always* set aside No One Turned Away For Lack Of Funds seats, every year (even when the pay tickets are selling like hotcakes online, as they tend to do).

If you are someone who has been staying away from Girl Talk due to finances, please don’t worry about it. Just email us at <girltalktheshow@gmail.com> saying you need a NOTAFLOF ticket, and we will add you to our NOTAFLOF seat list. We love you, and we want you in the audience. Please come! :)

(x-posted from my facebook & the Girl Talk facebook invite)

Dear Trans Men (and Trans Masc Spectrum Theys),

odofemi:

I know that I’m always bugging you, whether for your numbers so that I can get added to your seemingly infinite lists of booty calls or because I’m calling you out for whatever form of misogyny has me angry today, but we need to talk. Again. Here’s the thing: in the past couple of years, you’ve really made some strides in recognizing that trans women get the fuzzy end of the Queer Community lollipop. And that’s great. I’m glad that you’re starting to see what we’ve been talking about for the past thirty years.

But I need you all to commit to something for me. I know, I know — you have commitment issues. Believe me, after the 14 trans guys I’ve dated over the last two years, I know all about your commitment issues. But I really need you to do this for me. I’m not going to sugar it by saying that it’s going to be easy, either. This one takes some real commitment.

Here’s what I’m asking for: stop speaking at/performing at/having your art featured in conferences, panel discussions, art shows, rock shows, and any other event that says it’s about “gender” or “trans people” or even “queer people” but does not actively include trans women.

Take a moment. Breathe. Ground. Centre.

“But how will I ever have my art shown again?!” you ask in horror, while silently wondering how you’ll get laid without the Queer Points you earn from having your stuff everywhere the cool queers are.

To this I can only reply, “Welcome to our world.”

Here’s the thing: if you are putting on or participating in shows/conferences/events that are about “trans people,” and no trans women are significantly involved? Those sausage-less-fests are contributing to the marginalization of trans women who are supposedly part of your community. And that marginalization translates into our higher vulnerability to many things, not the least of which being intimate partner violence and suicidality. And it’s just a shitty thing to do.

Don’t want to stop doing these events? Ok, I’m willing to give you an option. I’m a giver, as my previously mentioned laundry list of exboyfriends can surely attest.

Call it something else. It’s very simple. If you event is called, say, “TRANS/gender/ART,” rename it to what it actually is “MASC/fest.” I actually am not opposed to that. Everyone knows I enjoy a good MASC/fest. I could go for one right now, as a matter of fact (call me maybe?). If we start to call things as they are, at least then we’ll all know what we really mean. Clarity is adjacent to Godliness.

Start asking questions. If cis queer or trans masc organizers come to you and ask you to be in their show/conference/event, ask who else is featured. Ask if trans women have been included in the organizing in any way. And, if they haven’t been, ask why. You might hear a lot of borderline horrifying things about trans women with that last question. I’ve heard them when I’ve asked, and you’d think they’d at least feign ignorance around me as a known trans lady. I can only imagine what they’ll say to you.

If you’re not willing to make this commitment, please consider not calling yourself an ally to trans women. And in doing so, please stop invoking Sylvia Rivera, Marsha P Johnson, and the litany of each year’s murdered trans women (mostly sex workers and mostly women of colour) that we call TDOR.

Tenderly,

~Your Girl Friday (after your date with your Other Girl Friday, of course)


Required reading.

(via calibanandthesnitch)